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Cinema of the World: The Collector (William Wyler, 1965)

25 Ago

William Wyler – The Collector (1965)

Cast: Terence Stamp, Samantha Eggar, Mona Washbourne…

Plot Synopsis

John Fowles‘s novel The Collector was written in the form of a dual diary, one kept by a kidnapper, the other by his victim. The film is told almost exclusively from the point of view of the former, a nerdish British bank clerk named Freddy Clegg (Terence Stamp). A neurotic recluse whose only pleasure is butterfly collecting, Clegg wins $200,000 in the British Football Pool. He purchases a huge country estate, fixes up its cellar with all the comforts of home, then kidnaps Miranda (Samantha Eggar), an art student whom he has worshipped from afar. The demented Clegg doesn’t want ransom, nor does he want to rape the girl: he simply wants to collect her. She isn’t keen on this, and tries several times to escape. After several weeks, Clegg and Miranda grow increasingly fond of one another, and Clegg promises to let her go. When time comes for the actual release, however, Clegg decides that Miranda hasn’t completely come around to his way of thinking and changes his mind, leading to a further series of unfortunate events. By Hal Erickson (allmovie.com)

Sequenze:

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Review:

I suppose it was the loneliness and being far away from anything else that made me decide to buy the house. And after I did I told myself I’d never go through with the plan, even though I’d made all the preparations and knew where she was every minute of the day.

With these opening lines, Freddie Clegg (Terence Stamp) confirms to the viewer that a ride of haunting and psychological suspense is in store for all who attempt to harness a personality so perplexing and multilayered. Clegg possesses a personality that dwells in the valley of sexual repression and delayed maturity, skirting peaks of gauche inferiority to his surrounding peers. His life revolves around the low of his dreary job as a bank clerk to what he considers his supreme hold on life as he knows it – the collecting of butterflies. He has just won a considerable amount of money on the English football pools and what he intends to do with it is the gist of this tale – the collection of a human specimen in the form of London art student, Miranda Grey (Samantha Eggar).

Clegg purchases an Elizabethan country estate that holds the prize of ancient cellars that will contain his quarry. Once Miranda has been spirited away in a kidnapping by him, the real story begins. A game of cat and mouse ensues and over the course of the erupting minutes, one is never quite sure what will or will not happen. Will she escape or will evil prevail?

Terence Stamp and Samantha Eggar have etched luminous performances under the direction of veteran Hollywood director, William Wyler. Stamp’s Clegg is horrifying in an obscene way, for he projects terror as can only be portrayed by one who is truly mad and consorting with harbingers of class distinction as he perceives them to be. He is that most capable of monsters who needs no makeup or agents from the supernatural world to make his mark, but rather the corrupt nature of a beast that blends so well into the woodwork as to be unseen to the naked eye. The precision of each move he makes and the play from his dark eyes as they change, chameleon like, from drone to madman, are a marvelous and terrifying thing to see.

Samantha Eggar is Stamp’s perfect foil, the hunted as pursued by the hunter, in a match that will determine her ultimate fate. She is in a damned if you do and damned if you don’t situation. She morphs from a carefree, young art student to a woman caught in a web of deceit, sexual outbursts and insanity. She has become the latest ‘catch’ for Clegg, the crown jewel of his collection. Miranda has only one way out — to learn to love Clegg by being his ‘guest’. Will she? It will become a battle of survival of the fittest.

The Collector is based upon the novel by John Fowles that created such a stir in the early 60’s. The book took the form of a diary as written by Miranda after her capture and betrayed all of the emotions, gambits and tragedies that befell the twosome. The screenplay as written by Stanley Mann and John Kohn is quite literate and maintains a steady stream of interest in this royal battle of the sexes. They were both nominated for and Oscar Best Screenplay, along with Wyler for Best Director and Eggar as Best Actress. Wyler is best known as the director of such perennial favourites as Ben Hur, The Best Years of Our Lives and Wuthering Heights.  (…) by  Mary Sibley (www.thespinningimage.co.uk)

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Pubblicato da su 25 agosto 2010 in Cinema

 

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Una risposta a “Cinema of the World: The Collector (William Wyler, 1965)

  1. Rod Delarue

    25 agosto 2010 at 01:40

    William Wyler – The Collector (1965)
    Link: http://www.worldscinema.com/2010/08/william-wyler-collector-1965.html

     

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